Iulia Linnea (iulia_linnea) wrote,
Iulia Linnea
iulia_linnea

Sesame Street, and Niece's thoughts on Severus and Lily's friendship

*points to icon*

We all know their truth, Sesame Street, but nice try.

In fandom, everyone has a sexual orientation.

In other news, I had an interesting conversation about Lily and Severus with my niece this morning that concerned the following passage from Book Seven (which I pulled from my American edition):

Lily and Snape were walking across the castle courtyard, evidently arguing. Harry hurried to catch up with them, to listen in. As he reached them, he realized how much taller they both were. A few years seemed to have passed since their Sorting.

". . . thought we were supposed to be friends?" Snape was saying, "Best friends?"

"We are, Sev, but I don't like some of the people you're hanging round with! I'm sorry, but I detest Avery and Mulciber! Mulciber! What do you see in him, Sev, he's creepy! D'you know what he tried to do to Mary MacDonald the other day?"

Lily had reached a pillar and leaned against it, looking up into the thin, sallow face.

"That was nothing," said Snape. "It was a laugh, that's all—"

"It was Dark Magic, and if you think that's funny—"


My niece told me that one of her friends thinks that Lily stopped being Sev's friend because he called her Mudblood, but she disagrees because, as she told me, "If he knew his friend was doing Dark magic and let him, that makes him bad. And Lily said he'd made a choice to be friends with bad people—to be a Death Eater—so she couldn't be his friend anymore. The bad name wasn't why."

Other than thinking that the Mudblood scene is a last-straw moment for Lily, I completely agree with Niece on this point; we don't see the half of it where Lily and Severus are concerned, in much the same way that we don't see a lot of "missing" scenes involving several characters by virtue of the books largely being told from Harry's PoV. Yet, while a lot of fen are content to imagine extra-canonical scenes by way of explaining the conduct of myriad characters, it's rare to see anyone give Lily the same benefit of the doubt in that way.

Of course there was more to the end of Lily and Severus' friendship than one name-calling incident, but imagine if you realized that, even though you'd been trying to ignore it, your best friend was a racist, and you were a part of the group that he despised. How would you react to being called a racial epithet by the friend you loved and trusted? In a climate in which people just like you were in actual danger of their lives, in a time when war over that fact was coming and your "friend" had picked the evil side—the side that wanted to kill people like you—could you ignore your friend's behavior? ignore his use of that epithet and what it implied? Only if your sense of self-preservation wasn't particularly high, I'm thinking, and canonically, Lily Evans is a v. smart girl.

The upshot? I'm proud of my niece for her critical thinking (what eight-year-old uses textual evidence to support her views to her friends? *dances*). Regardless of the fact that Severus is my favorite HP character, I know he's a canonical shit, and I'm glad that my niece can see past her interest in Severus to the extent that she can give Lily some credit for cutting him off when doing so, in my niece and my opinion, is the only option open to her. The argument Harry saw couldn't possibly have been the only one that Lily had with Severus about his choice of friends, but ultimately, it must have seemed to Lily that there was no saving Sev from himself.

P.S. from Shog: Religious People Are Nerds and Game of Thrones RPG Deleted Scenes.
Tags: bert/ernie, family, gip, lily evans, links, severus snape, vids
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